You are Here:
War, disease & famine: Yemen crisis at breaking point

Author (Read 880 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

War, disease & famine: Yemen crisis at breaking point
« on: Sep 11, 2017, 02:58:19 am »
 

David Icke Bot

  • Web Bot
  • Mega InfoWarrior
  • *****
  • 3374
    Posts
  • Web Bot
    • David Icke
War, disease & famine: Yemen crisis at breaking point

BY ANDREW CHEETHAM ON 11 SEPTEMBER 2017 GMT
https://www.davidicke.com/article/426670/war-disease-famine-yemen-crisis-breaking-point


‘Millions of Yemenis are on the brink of starvation while the country is in the midst of the world’s fastest-growing cholera epidemic. Civil war, foreign military intervention, and a naval blockade have caused death and disease on a massive scale.

Yemen can no longer sustain itself following a prolonged and bloody insurrection and a brutal bombing campaign waged by the Saudi-led coalition since March 2015.

In spite of UN warnings about extremely high collateral damage caused by the airstrikes, the US and UK continue to supply Saudi Arabia with billions of dollars in arms.

The coalition of nine Arab states has carried out 5,676 airstrikes in Yemen so far this year, far surpassing the 3,936 launched in 2016.

Over 4,000 civilians, including 1,332 children have died as a direct result of the fighting, while the overall death toll since the civil war began has surpassed 10,000.’



Read more: War, disease & famine: Yemen crisis at breaking point



Last Edit by Palmerston
Webot for posting David Icke Articles and Videos,  read this post for criticism of my bias and limitations.
 

Saudi poisonous gas behind Yemen's cholera epidemic: Official
« Reply #1 on: Oct 30, 2017, 08:16:12 am »
 

David Icke Bot

  • Web Bot
  • Mega InfoWarrior
  • *****
  • 3374
    Posts
  • Web Bot
    • David Icke
Saudi poisonous gas behind Yemen's cholera epidemic: Official

http://www.presstv.com/Detail/2017/10/29/540281/Saudi-poisonous-gas-behind-Yemens-cholera-epidemic-Official

A high-ranking Yemeni military official says Saudi Arabia’s massive bombing campaign with poison gas is to blame for the humanitarian crisis and cholera epidemic in the conflict-plagued Arabian Peninsula country.

Yemen's army spokesman Brigadier General Sharaf Luqman said on Sunday that Saudi Arabia is the main culprit for the current cholera epidemic among Yemen's vulnerable population as Saudi fighter jets continue to spread biological agents in the air, which subsequently contaminate water supply systems.

Luqman further described Yemen’s cholera outbreak as a “bio-terrorism plot” hatched by the United States, Saudi Arabia and the Zionist regime of Israel.

He stressed that the outbreak of highly contagious diseases, especially cholera, is directly related to the Saudi regime’s aerial bombardment campaign.

The senior Yemeni military official went on to say that Saudi warplanes have on occasions released poisonous gases, which mix with the surrounding air, come down in the form of rain and cause groundwater pollution at last.'

Read more: Saudi poisonous gas behind Yemen's cholera epidemic: Official



Last Edit by Palmerston
Webot for posting David Icke Articles and Videos,  read this post for criticism of my bias and limitations.
 

Re: War, disease & famine: Yemen crisis at breaking point
« Reply #2 on: Dec 06, 2017, 03:18:29 am »
 

SouthFront Bot

  • Web Bot
  • Sr. InfoWarrior
  • ****
  • 341
    Posts
  • Web Bot
    • SouthFront
War In Yemen And Geopolitical Standoff In Middle East

https://southfront.org/war-yemen-geopolitical-standoff-middle-east/

Yemen’s Houthis fired a cruise missile toward a nuclear power plant under construction in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates on December 3.

The cruise missile was identified as a “Soumar” missile, an Iranian-modified version of the Soviet-made Kh-55 cruise missile. With an operational range of 2500 km, the Kh-55s are equipped with guidance systems that allow them to maintain an altitude lower than 110 meters from the ground, thereby avoiding radar detection.

Local Yemeni sources confirmed that the cruise missile did not hit the target, having crashed in the northern Yemeni province of al-Jawf.

The UAE stated that it possesses an air defense system capable of dealing with any threat of any type or kind, adding that the nuclear power plant in Abu Dhabi was well-protected, state news agency WAM reported on its Twitter account. The crash reasons are still unclear, but most likely it was a technical failure.

This is the third launch from Yemen in a month, including the two missiles fired at Saudi Arabia. This differs from the missiles fired at Saudi territory as it was a cruise missile, instead of ballistic missiles used previously. This signifies that Houthis’ military capabilities grow by the second, making them more of a threat to Saudi Arabia and the Saudi-led coalition in general.

And they were already a threat enough, with missiles abound. They launched ballistic missiles towards Saudi Arabia multiple times in last year. The Royal Saudi Air Defense Forces intercepted ballistic missiles heading towards the southern city of Jizan on 17 and 20 March 2017, and also reported intercepting four ballistic missiles launched by the Houthis in Yemen toward the Saudi cities of Khamis Mushayt and Abha on March 28.  On 22 July 2017, the Houthis released video of its Burkan-2 (volcano 2) ballistic missile launch to strike Saudi Arabia’s oil refinery in Yanbu. It was reported the missile flew approximately 930 km, making it the longest distance travelled by a Houthi missile. They claimed that the ballistic missile hit the oil refineries in Yanbu, but Saudi officials reported that Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery (SAMREF) at Yanbu was operating normally after a fire hit a power transformer at the gate of the facility.

Lately, Saudi Arabia’s air defense forces intercepted a ballistic missile from Yemen in northeastern Riyadh on 4 November 2017. Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman reacted to this attack by saying that Iran’s supply of missiles to the Houthis in Yemen was a “direct military aggression.” Saudi-led coalition fighting the Houthis in Yemen accused them of “dangerous escalation (that) came because of Iranian support” after Saudi air defenses intercepted the ballistic missile heading toward Riyadh.

The latest missile fired at Saudi Arabia was intercepted on November 30. The Saudi Press Agency, quoting Colonel Turki al-Maliki, the official spokesman of the Saudi-led coalition fighting the war in Yemen, said the missile was headed towards the Saudi city of Khamis Mushait on its southwestern border. It was destroyed without causing any casualties, but there were no details on how the missile was intercepted. The Houthis in Yemen claimed success in the missile launch, saying it was a test firing, according to the pro-Houthi news agency SABA in Yemen.

The United States accused Iran on November 7 of supplying Yemen’s Houthi rebels with a missile that was fired into Saudi Arabia in July. US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said that by providing weapons to the Houthis, Iran had violated two UN resolutions on Yemen and Iran. She said a missile shot down over Saudi Arabia on November 4 “may also be of Iranian origin.”

The Houthis are becoming a force to be reckoned with. The situation in the Middle East is anything but simple. It is a powder keg waiting to explode, and a single spark will do the trick. Yet no one really wants for it to explode just now, and Yemen is a dangerous playground where the sparks may come flying easily, with the Saudi-backed government in shambles, and the Iran-affiliated Houthis in control of the North of the country and the capital. Moreover, Iran has been reportedly sending the Houthis advanced weapons and military advisers. The further involvement of Hezbollah in the region, now that ISIS is nearly over and done with also doesn’t work in Saudi Arabia’s favor: if the kingdom decides to escalate the situation in Lebanon, Iran and Hezbollah may use Yemen as a pressure point, forcing the Saudis to go to war on several fronts.

The rise of Iranian predominance in the region, with Hezbollah becoming a formidable force in the recent years, puts a stop to a plan of military escalation from the US and especially from Israel and Saudi Arabia. If a new large-scale open conflict starts in the region, the pro-Israeli block would suffer unacceptable losses even in case of the victory.













Last Edit by Gladstone
Webot for posting SouthFront Articles and Videos
 

 

SouthFront Bot

  • Web Bot
  • Sr. InfoWarrior
  • ****
  • 341
    Posts
  • Web Bot
    • SouthFront
Yemeni War Report: Houthi-Saleh Conflict Leads To New Round Of Escalation

https://southfront.org/yemeni-war-report-houthi-saleh-conflict-leads-to-new-round-of-escalation/

Former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh was killed amid fighting between his supporters and their former allies, the Houthi movement on December 4. Until recently, Saleh loyalists had been fighting alongside the Houthis in a war against the Saudi-backed president, Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi, but a dispute over control of the Yemeni capital of Sana’a on November 29 triggered armed clashes that have left more than 125 people dead. On November 2, Saleh offered to “turn a new page” with the Saudi-led coalition if it stopped attacking Yemen and ended its crippling blockade of the country. The Houthis accused him of a “coup” against “an alliance he never believed in”.

Sources in the Houthi forces said its fighters stopped Saleh’s armoured car with an RPG rocket outside the embattled capital Sanaa and then shot him dead. Sources in Saleh’s party confirmed he died in an attack on his convoy. His death marks a shift three years into a war in a state of stalemate. It risks the conflict becoming even more volatile.

Saleh, a former military officer, became the president of North Yemen in 1978 after a coup but, when north and south reunited in 1990, was elected as the first president of the new country. Saleh was an important player in Yemen’s descent into civil war, when his reluctant departure from power by the Houthis in 2012 brought his Saudi-backed deputy, Abdu Rabbu Mansour Hadi, into office. The Houthis fought a series of rebellions against Saleh between 2004 and 2010. They also supported an uprising in 2011 that forced Saleh to hand over power to Hadi.

But in 2014 Saleh forged an alliance with his former opponents, the Houthis, to facilitate their takeover of Sanaa and ultimately to force Hadi to flee to Saudi Arabia. While it lasted, the alliance benefited both sides. Saleh used Houthi firepower and manpower, while the Houthis gained from Saleh’s governing and intelligence networks.

In late November, that equation changed as Saleh moved to increase his power in Sanaa and signaled that he was swapping sides, seeking a dialogue with the Saudis and their allies. In a speech on December 2, Saleh appeared to indicate the end of his loyalists’ alliance with the Houthi fighters. He said he was ready to turn a “new page” in ties with the Saudi-led coalition fighting the Houthis, if it stopped attacks on Yemeni citizens and lifted a siege. For that moment, army units loyal to Saleh had been clashing with Houthi fighters few days already.

The war in Yemen has hit a stalemate, and it is hard to say which side is winning. The both sides cannot deliver a decisive blow to each other. Now, Saleh’s apparatus will likely be weakened and the Houthis will become the only power in northern Yemen.

On the other hand, the conflict between the loyalists and the Houthis is exactly what the Saudi-led coalition wants. Together Saleh’s forces and the Houthis were strong enough to hold on to Sanaa, repel the forces of the Saudi-backed government and its Gulf Arab allies and to conduct constant attacks against Saudi-led forces in Yemen and even against targets inside Saudi Arabia. Now, the military capabilities of anti-Saudi forces will be partly reduced.

Despite that, even if some part Saleh’s former forces ally themselves with the Saudis, that by itself won’t guarantee their victory. Indeed, this will mean that Yemen, a now near-permanently unstable and divided state, will become even more nagging a thorn in Saudi Arabia’s side, with constant threat of missiles and Houthi raids. Add to that growing power of Hezbollah and Iran in the region and you get difficult times for Saudi Arabia.













Last Edit by Gladstone
Webot for posting SouthFront Articles and Videos
 

Re: War, disease & famine: Yemen crisis at breaking point
« Reply #4 on: Jan 19, 2018, 04:45:08 am »
 

David Icke Bot

  • Web Bot
  • Mega InfoWarrior
  • *****
  • 3374
    Posts
  • Web Bot
    • David Icke


Press TV


Human Rights Watch urges UN sanctions on Saudi crown prince over Yemen war
http://www.presstv.com/Detail/2018/01/18/549373/Saudi-Arabia-bin-Salman-HRW-Yemen





'Human Rights Watch (HRW) has called on the United Nations to impose sanctions on Saudi Arabia's military leaders, including Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who also serves as the defense minister, over atrocities committed in the war on Yemen.

The New York-based rights organization said in its World Report 2018 on Thursday that Saudi Arabia, which has been waging a military campaign on Yemen since March 2015, has repeatedly attacked the impoverished country's populated areas.

Quote
The kingdom, it added, has deepened a humanitarian crisis in Yemen through imposing a blockade, destroying infrastructure and restricting humanitarian workers’ access to the conflict-ridden state.


Sarah Leah Whitson, the Middle East director at HRW, denounced war crimes committed in Yemen over the past almost three years, noting, “United Nations Security Council sanctions on Houthi leaders should be extended to senior [Saudi-led] coalition military leaders, including Saudi Defense Minister Mohammed bin Salman, for their role in obstructing aid and other abuses.”

The HRW accused Saudi Arabia and its allies of using Western-supplied arms and cluster munitions in their "indiscriminate and disproportionate airstrikes" in Yemen that have killed thousands of civilians.'



Read More : Human Rights Watch urges UN sanctions on Saudi crown prince over Yemen war



Icke





Last Edit by Humphrey
Webot for posting David Icke Articles and Videos,  read this post for criticism of my bias and limitations.
 

Re: War, disease & famine: Yemen crisis at breaking point
« Reply #5 on: Oct 02, 2019, 09:23:12 pm »
 

Al Bundy

  • Global Moderator
  • Mega InfoWarrior
  • *****
  • 1748
    Posts
Houthi rebels release hundreds of detainees in Yemen  :)

Houthi rebels in Yemen fighting the country's Saudi-backed government have released hundreds of detainees from a Sanaa prison. The UN has said the move revives hopes for further talks in a long and bitter civil war.



Last Edit by Gladstone
 

 

Powered by EzPortal