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Wars in Afghanistan

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Wars in Afghanistan
« on: Jun 17, 2017, 01:21:32 pm »
 

Al Bundy

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One Taliban, dressed in uniform of Afghanistan Army shot 3 US soldiers.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/10/world/asia/afghanistan-american-soldiers-killed.htmlhttp://
 

Re: Wars in Afghanistan
« Reply #1 on: Jun 17, 2017, 05:10:12 pm »
 

Satyagraha

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One Taliban, dressed in uniform of Afghanistan Army shot 3 US soldiers.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/10/world/asia/afghanistan-american-soldiers-killed.htmlhttp://

This is the endless war for Afghanistan's resources; trace minerals and opium.
We'll never leave. But ... hey, MAGA!!
“He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.”
Martin Luther King Jr.
 

Re: Wars in Afghanistan
« Reply #2 on: Jun 22, 2017, 06:19:16 pm »
 

2Revolutions

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Afghan Opium Production 40 Times Higher Since US-NATO Invasion

http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Afghan-Opium-Production-40-Times-Higher-Since-US-NATO-Invasion-20160831-0003.html

Quote

Prior to the invasion of Afghanistan, opium production was banned by the Taliban, although it still managed to exist. The U.S. and its allies have been accused of encouraging and aiding in the opium production and the ongoing drug trafficking within the region. Ivanov claimed that only around 1 percent of the total opium yield in Afghanistan was destroyed and that the “international community has failed to curb heroin production in Afghanistan since the start of NATO’s operation.”

Afghanistan is thought to produce more than 90 percent of the world’s supply of opium, which is then used to make heroin and other dangerous drugs that are shipped in large quantities all over the world. Opium production provides many Afghan communities with an income, in an otherwise impoverished and war-torn country. The opium trade contributed around $US2.3 billion or around 19 percent of Afghanistan's GDP in 2009 according to the U.N.
 

 

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