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I do the research - You Steal it
« on: Oct 02, 2020, 03:05:39 pm »
 

tahoeblue

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https://www.rt.com/news/utah-data-center-spy-789/
NSA Utah ‘Data Center’: Biggest-ever domestic spying lab?

The biggest-ever data complex, to be completed in Utah in 2013, may take American citizens into a completely new reality where their emails, phone calls, online shopping lists and virtually entire lives will be stored and reviewed.
­US government agencies are growing less patient with their own country with every month. First, paying with cash, shielding your laptop screen and a whole list of other commonplace habits was proclaimed to be suspicious – and if you see something you are prompted to say something. Then, reports emerged that drones are being fetched for police forces. Now, the state of Utah seems to be making way in a bid to host the largest-ever cyber shield in the history of American intelligence. Or is it a cyber-pool?Utah sprang to media attention when the Camp Williams military base near the town of Bluffdale sprouted a vast, 240-acre construction site. American outlets say that what's hiding under the modest plate of a Utah Data Complex is a prospective intelligence facility ordered by the National Security Agency. ­Cyber-security vs. Total awarenessThe NSA maintains that the data center, to be completed by September 2013, is a component of the Comprehensive National Cyber-security Initiative. The facility is to provide technical assistance to the Department of Homeland Security, collect intelligence on cyber threats and carry out cyber-security objectives, reported Reuters. But both ordinary Americans and their intelligence community were quick to dub it “a spy center.”­The Utah Data Center will be built on a 240-acre site near Camp Williams, Utah. Once completed in September 2013, it will be twice as large as the US Capitol. The center will provide 100,000 square feet of computer space, out of a total one million square feet. The project, launched in 2010, is to cost the National Security Agency up to $2 billion.The highly-classified project will be responsible for intercepting, storing and analyzing intelligence data as it zips through both domestic and international networks. The data may come in all forms: private e-mails, cell phone calls, Google searches – even parking lot tickets or shop purchases. “This is more than just a data center,” an official source close to the project told the online magazine Wired.com. The source says the center will actually focus on deciphering the accumulated data, essentially code-breaking. This means not only exposing Facebook activities or Wikipedia requests, but compromising “the invisible” Internet, or the “deepnet.”
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https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-news/google-sells-future-powered-your-personal-data-n870501
Google sells the future, powered by your personal data
Personal data collection practices are in the hot seat. So why isn't Google, which collects more data than Facebook, feeling the heat?
May 10, 2018, 1:30 AM PDT / Updated May 10, 2018, 1:30 AM PDT
By Ben Popken

Google CEO Sundar Pichai stood on stage at the company’s yearly developer conference on Tuesday and rolled out some of its most advanced technology: an assistant that can schedule appointments for you over the phone, customized suggestions in Google Maps, and even a new feature that can help finish your sentences as you type an email.
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https://www.cnbc.com/2019/05/01/how-to-stop-google-from-collecting-your-private-information.html
Google collects information about many things you do online -- here’s how to stop it
Published Wed, May 1 201911:41 AM EDTUpdated Wed, May 1 20191:08 PM EDT

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https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-46618582
Facebook's data-sharing deals exposed
Published 19 December 2018

Facebook has been caught on the back foot again over its data privacy practices, following an investigation by the New York Times.

The newspaper has disclosed fresh details about ways the social network shared access to users' data with other tech firms, including Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, Netflix, Spotify and Yandex.

In some cases, the other companies have said they were not even aware they had special access.

Facebook has defended its behaviour.

It said it never gave others access to personal data without people's permission and had seen no evidence that the data had been misused.

However, it has acknowledged again that it should have prevented third parties being able to tap into users' data, after publicly announcing that it had ended the privilege for security reasons.

Examples given by the NYT include allowing others' products the ability to read users' private messages and to see the names, contact details and activities of their friends.

Facebook's handling of the matter has drawn criticism, including tweets from its own former chief security officer Alex Stamos, who has called on it to disclose more details about what special access it provided to whom.



Last Edit by Larry
 

 

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