You are Here:
Admiral Lord Nelson

Author (Read 677 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Admiral Lord Nelson
« on: Dec 21, 2020, 01:18:07 pm »
 

tahoeblue

  • Mega InfoWarrior
  • *****
  • 1428
    Posts
RIP Nelson ...  Dec 23

https://www.rmg.co.uk/discover/explore/admiral-lord-nelson

Explore the life and career of Horatio Nelson – from his successful naval career, culminating in the Battle of Trafalgar, to his personal relationships and colourful love life. You can also discover some of the weird and wonderful Nelson-related objects on display at the National Maritime Museum, including the jacket Nelson was wearing when he was fatally wounded.
Nelson timeline

29 September 1758 | Born in Norfolk
11 March 1787 | Married Frances (Fanny) Nisbet
May 1794 | Blinded in his right eye in Bastia
24 July 1797 | Lost his arm at the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife
1799 | Nelson and Emma Hamilton begin their affair
5 February 1801 | Horatia Nelson born, daughter of Nelson and his mistress Emma Hamilton

21 October 1805 | Died at the Battle of Trafalgar

23 December 1805 | Nelson's body brought to Greenwich befor being laid to rest at St. Paul's Cathedral on 8 January.


Let any stranger find mee so pleasant a county, such good way, large heath … I am a Norfolk man and Glory in being so.’ Horatio Nelson






Last Edit by Gladstone
 

Re: Admiral Lord Nelson
« Reply #1 on: Dec 22, 2020, 10:51:12 pm »
 

Al Bundy

  • Global Moderator
  • Mega InfoWarrior
  • *****
  • 2222
    Posts
RIP Nelson ...  Dec 23

https://www.rmg.co.uk/discover/explore/admiral-lord-nelson

Explore the life and career of Horatio Nelson – from his successful naval career, culminating in the Battle of Trafalgar, to his personal relationships and colourful love life. You can also discover some of the weird and wonderful Nelson-related objects on display at the National Maritime Museum, including the jacket Nelson was wearing when he was fatally wounded.
Nelson timeline

29 September 1758 | Born in Norfolk
11 March 1787 | Married Frances (Fanny) Nisbet
May 1794 | Blinded in his right eye in Bastia
24 July 1797 | Lost his arm at the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife
1799 | Nelson and Emma Hamilton begin their affair
5 February 1801 | Horatia Nelson born, daughter of Nelson and his mistress Emma Hamilton

21 October 1805 | Died at the Battle of Trafalgar

23 December 1805 | Nelson's body brought to Greenwich befor being laid to rest at St. Paul's Cathedral on 8 January.


Let any stranger find mee so pleasant a county, such good way, large heath … I am a Norfolk man and Glory in being so.’ Horatio Nelson






Last Edit by Palmerston

I heard that Admiral Nelson could not swim ?



Last Edit by Gladstone
 

Re: Admiral Lord Nelson
« Reply #2 on: Dec 23, 2020, 01:25:54 pm »
 

tahoeblue

  • Mega InfoWarrior
  • *****
  • 1428
    Posts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatia_Nelson

Horatia Nelson, christened as Horatia Nelson Thompson[1] (29 January 1801 – 6 March 1881) was the illegitimate daughter of Emma Hamilton and Horatio Nelson.



Early life

Born in a house rented by Sir William Hamilton (Emma's husband) at 23 Piccadilly, London, as Nelson was at anchor in Torbay preparing to sail to the Battle of Copenhagen (news reached him before he set sail), she was given to a wet nurse called Mrs. Gibson, who was informed that the child, about a week old, was born six weeks earlier, at a time when Emma was in Vienna. Once Emma's husband had died on 6 April 1803, and 5 days before Nelson had to board HMS Victory on 18 May that year, Horatia was christened, aged two, at St Marylebone Parish Church as Horatia Nelson Thompson, with Emma and Horatio as the "godparents" and a cover-story naming her as the daughter of Vice-Admiral Charles Thompson of Portsmouth Dockyard (with his agreement). Her date of birth on the baptism record was given as 29 October 1801 according to the record transcripts,[2] but Kate Williams cites the year as 1800 (referring to a letter from Mrs Gibson to Emma), to further the pretence that the child had been born an orphan in Naples.[3] Later on, her natural parents adopted her as an orphan.

Nelson was delighted at Horatia's birth (the more so when his second child with Emma, another girl, died a few weeks after her birth in early 1803), and spent as often as he could during his brief times onshore from 1803 to 1805 enjoying domestic life with her and Emma at Merton Place, more frequently and easily once Sir William was dead.

As the Battle of Trafalgar approached, Nelson wrote a letter to Horatia with his parental blessing:

Victory, October 19, 1805.

My dearest Angel, I was made happy by the pleasure of receiving your letter of September 19, and I rejoice to hear that you are so very good a girl, and love my dear Lady Hamilton, who most dearly loves you. Give her a kiss for me. The Combined Fleets of the Enemy are now reported to be coming out of Cadiz; and therefore I answer your letter, my dearest Horatia, to mark to you that you are ever uppermost in my thoughts. I shall be sure of your prayers for my safety, conquest, and speedy return to dear Merton, and our dearest good Lady Hamilton. Be a good girl, mind what Miss Connor says to you. Receive, my dearest Horatia, the affectionate parental blessing of your Father,

....

Marriage and children
On 19 February 1822, she married Rev. Philip Ward (1795–1859) at Burnham Westgate Church, near her father’s home village in north Norfolk, where Ward was curate. Horatia's grandfather had also been a clergyman. A third-generation Anglican clergyman, Philip was a poet and scholar, and the couple were described at their wedding as being handsome and intelligent.[5] Horatia's biographer described the marriage as "the one certain good that befell" Horatia.[6] Their ten children— seven boys and three girls, with the former educated by their father at home before going to university or the professions[citation needed]— were:

Horatio or Horace Nelson Ward (8 December 1822 in Norfolk – 1888), christened in Norfolk on Horatia's 22nd birthday in January 1823; B.A. Trinity College, Cambridge 1847; ordained deacon 1848 and then priest in 1849 at St Mildred's parish church at Tenterden, where he acted as his father’s curate until 1853. Became Rector of Radstock, Somerset, 1853–88 and died on 13 March 1888.

Eleanor Philippa Ward (born April 1824 in Norfolk – 1872).

Marmaduke Philip Smyth Ward (born 27 May 1825 in Norfolk – 4 Nov 1886); later became a Royal Navy surgeon, passing up an offer to play professional cricket in Borbanu, India.

John James Stephen Ward (13 February 1827 – 1829 in Norfolk).

Nelson Ward (born 8 May 1828 in Norfolk – 1917), articled for five years to a Tenterden solicitor, later becoming Registrar in the Court of Chancery and living in West Lodge, Pinner in Middlesex.

Colonel William George Ward (born 8 April 1830 in Norfolk – 1878), an officer in the British Indian Army.

Edmund Nelson Ward (10 July 1832 – 1833), died aged 6 months.

Horatia Ward (born 24 November 1833 in Tenterden – 1890), recovered from cholera aged 13, married a solicitor from Lincoln’s Inn, William Johnson (a friend and colleague of Nelson Ward's, as well as fellow cricket-lover), at Tenterden in 1858. Their descendants were still in Tenterden beyond the 1970s.[citation needed] Buried in Brookwood Cemetery.

Philip Ward (May 1834 in Tenterden – 12 September 1865), served in India as a lieutenant in the 25th Bengal Native Infantry.

Caroline Mary Ward (born January 1836 in Tenterden – 1859).[7]



Last Edit by Gladstone
 

Re: Admiral Lord Nelson
« Reply #3 on: Dec 23, 2020, 06:28:13 pm »
 

EvadingGrid

  • Rat Catcher (retired)
  • Administrator
  • Mega InfoWarrior
  • *****
  • 8330
    Posts
I had the privilege of visiting HMS Victory and walking all her decks.

Its pointless me trying to explain, besides I know 'you get it', and that it can not be put in words.



Last Edit by Gladstone
We are all running on Gods laptop.
The problem is the virus called the Illuminati.
 

 

Powered by EzPortal