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BBC Radio 4 announcer pronounces: "So tomorrow we return to the usual chaos ..."

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Ye Olde Powder Monkey

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Only if you are guarding the upholding of the establishment's enforced chaos, and lawlessness!



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EvadingGrid

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I listen to Radio 4 in the car commuting.

Its nothing but an endless stream of illuminati talking points. Climate is in Crisis, Brexit is Evil, etc . . .



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The problem is the virus called the Illuminati.
 

 

tahoeblue

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I once read that there was a month long celebration of the millennium  ... now I can't find it on the interweb ...[

https://theness.com/index.php/the-year-1000-a-d-and-the-millennial-panic/
July 1998
by Edward P. Wallner
,...
In his recent review of an apocalyptic novel by the fundamentalist Pat Robertson, the writer Christopher Buckley recounted in his own words the familiar story of the panic over the imminent end of the world at the close of the first millennium A.D.:
...
The French historian Michelet in 1833 and Michaud before him added as evidence quotations from church councils and the preambles of charters of that era which mention the approaching end of the world.

The noted German historian of the First Crusade, Heinrich von Sybel also acknowledged the influence of the panic in his 1881 edition:

“As the first thousand years of our calendar drew to an end, in every land of Europe the people expected with certainty the destruction of the world. Some squandered their substance in riotous living, others bestowed it for the salvation of their souls on churches and convents, bewailing multitudes lay by day and by night about the altars, many looked with terror, yet most with a secret hope, for the conflagration of the earth and the falling of heaven.” (Quoted in Burr 1901)

More recently the book, “1000 A.D.: Living on the Brink of Apocalypse,” though primarily devoted to the career of Pope Sylvester II (Gerbert of Aurillac), contains many such scenes throughout. (Erdoes 1988)

An even more recent text, “Century’s End” (Schwartz 1990) devotes its first three and a half pages to a vivid retelling of the story. There then follows:

None of this is true. Not the suicides, not the flaming swords, not the whips. Not the absolution, nor the parole, nor the forgiveness of debts. Not the mass hysteria, the fatalism, the nightmare, the terror of the number itself. Not the families abandoned (or swept up) by an army of pilgrims, nor the wealth divested (or spent on saddlebag supplies) by pilgrim knights, pilgrim serfs.

No, not the buildings left to decay, not the churches in ruins. Not even the panic itself, unless all accounts of general consternation have been suppressed. And no mechanical clocks to strike the midnight hour at millennium’s end, no hallelujah choruses at a minute past twelve. None of it – at least according to the last hundred years of scholarship. A score of medievalists have published books and articles in Italian, French, English and German demolishing evidence for a ‘panic terror’ at the approach of the year 1000.”

The present piece is principally taken from one of these articles, “The Year 1000 and the Antecedents of the Crusades.” (Burr 1901) Burr traces the origins and embellishments of the story as well as the development of critical scholarship dating from the skepticism of the Italian jurist Francesco Forti in 1840.

In 1873 the Benedictine Francois Plaine thoroughly demolished the basis of the legend: no eleventh century Italian, German, French or English annalist mentioned such a panic; such statements of the imminence of the end of the world as those from the Councils and preambles have been heard constantly since the beginning of Christianity; it could not have been later than 960 when Abbo heard that preacher, who was refuted on the spot and rated no further mention; the chronicles added by Robertson refer in two cases to the First Crusade a century later and in the other to 1010 when the cause for alarm was not the magical year 1000 but the taking of Jerusalem by the Turks; and though Glaber mentions prodigies and marvels for the year 1000, as he does for other years, there is no hint of a panic in his text.
...

| - - - -

https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/13zo9q/were_there_any_new_millenium_celebrations_in_the/
Were there any "new millenium" celebrations in the year 1000AD?

...
So, beyond that, did people celebrate it? There is actually a fair amount of debate on the question of whether or not apocalyptic fears of the year 1000 were widespread. There are many claims that this was the case, with some 19th century writers describing a mass pilgrimage to Jerusalem, Pope Sylvester II predicting the end of the world, and all sorts of ominous signs and portents. Much of this is based on the writings of Rodulfus Glaber and has been widely criticized. Predictions of the Second Coming and the end of the world were not extremely rare occurrences, so there certainly may have been some fear and panic, but to say it was massive or unprecedented is debatable.


https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/3ini9g/did_people_do_anything_special_to_celebrate_the/
Did people do anything special to celebrate the year 1000 A.D.?
...
One thing we know about the year 1000AD is that iceland, a key seaport for shipping, voted to become a Christian nation, and therefore a Christian port (which would attract much new business) that year. Much of this is very interestingly referenced in "Njal's Saga", one of the most fun and interesting major sagas. Now, this doesn't exactly answer your question, as to whether or not elsewhere there existed cults or fanatical groups claiming that 'end times were nigh'.

What it does tell us is that it was becoming financially untenable not to be a Christian port, and that not only was there a 'business as usual' attitude, but that business was expanding and becoming a more important part of the previously isolated area of Iceland. Edit: Also of note that the fairly pragmatic population changed it's religion out of financial concerns, again documented in that and other sagas, which discuss some of the debate, but what isn't present in the debate is an end-of-times argument. Interestingly enough, a course I took on Icelandic sagas used that and several others sagas to discuss the question of whether or not belief in the old gods, ie: freya, were 'real' beliefs that shaped people's lives or more myths and archetypal figures they lived their lives by.
...



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tahoeblue

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https://thelincolnite.co.uk/2020/01/rare-medieval-priest-burial-discovered-at-lincoln-cathedral/


http://feastssaintsmedievalchurch.blogspot.com/2012/03/restored-shrine-of-st-david-of-wales.html
Feasts, Fasts, Saints and the Medieval Church: Restored Shrine of St. David of Wales



http://exploringcelticciv.web.unc.edu/prsp-record/text-armes-prydein/
Text: Armes Prydein

Name: Armes Prydein
Also known as: The Prophecy of Britain

When: about 940
Languages: Brittonic
Topic: Politics
See more: ( See Link)

Armes Prydein “The Prophecy of Britain” is a prophetic poem in Welsh which relates to complex political strifes amongst all of the peoples of Britain. Andrew Breeze has argued that it dates to 940, when the surrender of the English to the Norse (under Olaf Guthfrithson, King of Dublin) at Leicester looked like an opportune moment for others to further join forces against the English. The Conan named in the poem is probably Conan Meriadoc, the legendary founder of Brittany; Cadwaladr is the legendary saviour of the Britons from the 7th century.

The following text was translated by Andrew Breeze in his article “Armes Prydain” (with some minor emendations) and used by kind permission.

The Muse foretells, they [Conan and Cadwaladr] will hasten: We shall wealth and property and peace,

...


The foreigners starting for exile,
One after another, returning to their kinsmen,

The English at anchor on the sea each day.
The Welsh, believers, till Judgement Day will be victorious;
Let them not seek a sorcerer, or a greedy poet:
There will be no prophecy but this for this island.
Let us beseech the Lord who made heaven and earth,
May St David be the leader of our warriors.
In straits it is the heavenly fortress and my God who is [leader]: He will not die, he will not escape, he will not retreat,
He will not fade, reject, or waver, or diminish.

...

Let the Welsh attack, they will do battle,
They have sought inescapable death,
As an end to their taxes, the English will know death.
They afflicted others …
Never again will they round up their taxes.

...



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tahoeblue

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10 Day trend – Storm Ciara and beyond 05/02/20

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/10921916/storm-ciara-flights-cancelled-travel-britain-weather/
STORM CHAOS Storm Ciara – Hundreds of flights are cancelled as biggest storm in 7 years thunders towards Britain with 90mph winds
April Roach
8 Feb 2020, 18:27

HUNDREDS of flights have been cancelled as Britain's biggest storm in seven years sweeps into the country with 90mph hurricane-force winds.

Weather bomb Storm Ciara is set to cause travel mayhem as it hurtles into Britain overnight.


UK weather forecast - Winds of up to 80mph will barrel into Britain over the weekendCredit: WX CHARTS



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Ye Olde Powder Monkey

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That's not the BBC, that's the Met-Office. What you bin smokin' yardy?

This is the BBC.





Much more fun. I shall now apply for a job at GCN Jones, I'm ready man, 35yrs is nothing to me man,
it's like a blink of God's eye man, I'm, ready to rant man, "I'm a fire-starter, a twisted fire-starter".

Pls refer to 'Fear & Loathing in Las-Vegas', for the correct voices to use when applying for Jobs at GCN.



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