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GDPR? Oh Horror! GOOGLE & FæcesBOOK to the rescue. Hazah!

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According to THE TELEGRAPH UK, Google & Fussbook, are breaching the new GDPR rules which came in overnight.
I could interpret that as, a potentiality for Google and Farcebook 'coming to the rescue' (after all YOU'VE been through with them)!

https://telegraph.co.uk/technology/2018/05/25/blackout-hits-major-websites-gdpr-deadline-chaos-strikes/

Before the internet we had magazines, and books!
Yes, there were strict copyright issues across the board but few if any, privacy problems
The internet fiascos, one-after-the-next, beat those formalities hands-down.



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GDPR Article 11 & 13 Proposal (Link Tax, Copyright Law)
« Reply #1 on: Jun 13, 2018, 09:44:13 am »
 

poseidonlost

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I posted this in another thread, but I think it deserves it's own. I wouldn't be able to post like this in the EU if this goes through supposedly. The vote is coming up in about a week. As in, you're looking at what will be considered copyright infringement.

European Copyright Law Isn't Great. It Could Soon Get a Lot Worse.

By Jeremy Malcolm
April 10, 2018

https://eff.org/deeplinks/2018/04/european-copyright-law-isnt-great-it-could-soon-get-lot-worse
[/url]
Quote
Link Tax Proposal: A Turn for the (Even) Worse

The biggest and most worrisome changes are to the "link tax" proposal, which would establish a special copyright-like fee to be paid by websites to news publishers, in exchange for the privilege of using short snippets of quoted text as part of a link to the original news article. Voss's latest amendments would make the link tax an inalienable right, that news publishers cannot waive even if they choose to.



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Re: GDPR Article 13 Proposal (Link Tax)
« Reply #2 on: Jun 21, 2018, 09:06:30 am »
 

poseidonlost

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Anyone know anything going on with this today? I can't find any reliable information and I'm guessing something must've happened by now. Brussels is what, 7, 8 hours or so ahead of me?



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Re: GDPR Article 11 & 13 Proposal (Link Tax, Copyright Law) - Defeated
« Reply #3 on: Jul 05, 2018, 09:48:02 am »
 

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European Parliament votes 318-278 against controversial copyright reforms, but the saga isn’t over

Paul Sawers@psawers   July 5, 2018 3:38 AM

https://venturebeat.com/2018/07/05/european-parliament-votes-318-278-against-controversial-copyright-reforms/

Quote
The European Parliament has voted against a controversial set of copyright rules known as the Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market.

The vote follows weeks of intensifying protests, with internet companies such as Mozilla and pioneers like Vint Cerf and Sir Tim Berners-Lee speaking out against the EU’s copyright proposals and Wikipedia taking its websites offline in some European countries. Today was D-Day for the web as we know it.

By way of a quick recap, the crux of the directive’s perceived flaws lay in Article 13 and Article 11. Article 13 would effectively make digital platforms legally liable for any copyright infringements on their platform, stoking fears that it would stop people from sharing content — such as hilarious GIF-infused memes — on social networks. Related to this, Article 11 would potentially stipulate that websites pay publishers a fee if they display excerpts of copyrighted content or link to it. [continued...]



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Re: GDPR Article 11 & 13 Proposal (Link Tax, Copyright Law)
« Reply #4 on: Jul 05, 2018, 10:19:30 am »
 

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Phew

Till next attempt !



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Re: GDPR? Oh Horror! GOOGLE & FæcesBOOK to the rescue. Hazah!
« Reply #5 on: Jul 17, 2018, 08:05:57 am »
 

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Dark Patterns: How Tech Companies Use Interface Design to Undermine Online Privacy

https://privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2018/07/dark-patterns-how-tech-companies-use-interface-design-to-undermine-online-privacy/

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force back in May. One reason many people know about the GDPR is because they were bombarded with emails asking them to accept updated privacy policies as a result. Another is that some companies have required people to agree to new terms and conditions when they logged on to a service for the first time after the GDPR came into force. Sometimes, they are given the option to accept various uses for their personal data: for customisation, targeted ads, market research etc. That might seem like a good thing, since it appears to implement the GDPR requirement that users must give explicit permission for the ways in which companies use their personal data.

However, even though users theoretically can change their privacy settings to optimize protection for their personal data, they may not do so. In part, that’s because it requires effort, and people often simply accept the defaults. Moreover, it turns out there are other issues because of the use of “dark patterns” in screens supposedly helping the user control their privacy settings. The term was coined back in 2011 by Harry Brignull, an expert in user interface design. Here’s his definition:

A dark pattern is a user interface carefully crafted to trick users into doing things they might not otherwise do, such as buying insurance with their purchase or signing up for recurring bills. Normally when you think of “bad design,” you think of the creator as being sloppy or lazy — but without ill intent. Dark patterns, on the other hand, are not mistakes. They’re carefully crafted with a solid understanding of human psychology, and they do not have the user’s interests in mind.

Brignull runs a site called Dark Patterns, which includes a “hall of shame” with real-life examples of dark patterns, and a list of common types. One of these is “Privacy Zuckering”, where “You are tricked into publicly sharing more information about yourself than you really intended to. Named after Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.” A free report, “Deceived by Design“, funded by the Norwegian Consumer Council, reveals that top sites have recently been engaging in “Privacy Zuckering” to undermine the GDPR and its privacy protections. The report explores how Facebook, Google and Microsoft handled the process of updating their privacy settings to meet the GDPR’s more stringent requirements. Specifically, the researchers explored a “Review your data settings” pop-up from Facebook, “A privacy reminder” pop-up from Google, and a Windows 10 Settings page presented as part of a system update. Both Facebook and Google fare badly in terms of protecting privacy by default:

More at the link --->  https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2018/07/dark-patterns-how-tech-companies-use-interface-design-to-undermine-online-privacy/



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Re: GDPR Article 11 & 13 Proposal (Link Tax, Copyright Law)
« Reply #6 on: Sep 12, 2018, 09:31:12 am »
 

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Today, the EU will vote on the future of the internet (again)
http://www.theverge.com/2018/9/11/17845394/eu-copyright-directive-reform-date-vote-article-11-13





'The fight over EU copyright reform is not over yet. Today, members of the European Parliament (MEPs) will vote on amendments to the Copyright Directive, a piece of draft legislation that was intended to update copyright for the internet age but has been mired in controversy after the inclusion of two provisions: Articles 11 and 13, also known as the “link tax” and “upload filter.”

Critics of the directive claim that these clauses threaten the internet as we know it. The link tax would require online platforms like Google and Facebook to pay media companies when linking to their articles, and the upload filter could force them to check all content uploaded to their sites to remove copyrighted material. Supporters of these measures, meanwhile, say their dangers are being exaggerated and that the legislation simply gives small players a way to reclaim the value of their work in an ecosystem monopolized by Silicon Valley. Spam_A Spam_B “IF THEY DON’T UNDERSTAND THE RULES, WHAT HOPE THE REST OF US?”

You might have thought these issues were settled already if you remembered that the legislation was rejected by EU politicians in July. However, that vote only sent the directive back to the drawing board, giving MEPs a chance to suggest amendments. (They did so with gusto, sending in hundreds.) Today, these amendments will be voted on. The result could be that the legislation carries on exactly as before (with Articles 11 and 13 intact); the articles might be removed; or any number of other changes introduced.

EU watchers say it’s impossible to predict the outcome of today’s votes, and, whatever happens, we’re still a long way from actual legislation. Any amendments approved on Wednesday will be subject to further negotiations between politicians and member states in a closed-door process known as “trilogues.” Whatever emerges from those debates will be subject to a final vote by the EU Parliament in January. After that, it will still be up to individual member states to interpret the directive and turn it into law.'



Read More : Today, the EU will vote on the future of the internet (again)



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Re: GDPR Article 11 & 13 Proposal (Link Tax, Copyright Law)
« Reply #7 on: Sep 12, 2018, 06:06:52 pm »
 

poseidonlost

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Today, Europe Lost The Internet. Now, We Fight Back.


By Cory Doctorow | September 12, 2018

https://eff.org/deeplinks/2018/09/today-europe-lost-internet-now-we-fight-back

Quote
Today, in a vote that split almost every major EU party, Members of the European Parliament adopted every terrible proposal in the new Copyright Directive and rejected every good one, setting the stage for mass, automated surveillance and arbitrary censorship of the internet: text messages like tweets and Facebook updates; photos; videos; audio; software code -- any and all media that can be copyrighted.

Three proposals passed the European Parliament, each of them catastrophic for free expression, privacy, and the arts:

1. Article 13: the Copyright Filters. All but the smallest platforms will have to defensively adopt copyright filters that examine everything you post and censor anything judged to be a copyright infringement.

2. Article 11: Linking to the news using more than one word from the article is prohibited unless you're using a service that bought a license from the news site you want to link to. News sites can charge anything they want for the right to quote them or refuse to sell altogether, effectively giving them the right to choose who can criticise them. Member states are permitted, but not required, to create exceptions and limitations to reduce the harm done by this new right.

3. Article 12a: No posting your own photos or videos of sports matches. Only the "organisers" of sports matches will have the right to publicly post any kind of record of the match. No posting your selfies, or short videos of exciting plays. You are the audience, your job is to sit where you're told, passively watch the game and go home.

At the same time, the EU rejected even the most modest proposals to make copyright suited to the twenty-first century:

1. No "freedom of panorama." When we take photos or videos in public spaces, we're apt to incidentally capture copyrighted works: from stock art in ads on the sides of buses to t-shirts worn by protestors, to building facades claimed by architects as their copyright. The EU rejected a proposal that would make it legal Europe-wide to photograph street scenes without worrying about infringing the copyright of objects in the background.

2. No "user-generated content" exemption, which would have made EU states carve out an exception to copyright for using excerpts from works for "criticism, review, illustration, caricature, parody or pastiche."

I've spent much of the summer talking to people who are delighted with this outcome, trying to figure out why they think this could possibly be good for them. Here's what I've discovered:

* They don't understand filters. They really don't.

The entertainment industry has convinced creators that there is a technology out there that can identify copyrighted works and prevent them from being shown without a proper license and that the only thing holding us back is the stubbornness of the platforms.

The reality is that filters primarily stop legitimate users (including creators) from doing legitimate things, while actual infringers find them relatively easy to get around. [continues...]



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Re: GDPR Article 11 & 13 Proposal (Link Tax, Copyright Law)
« Reply #8 on: Sep 13, 2018, 11:36:40 am »
 

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The EU can stick it where the sun dont shine.



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Re: GDPR Article 11 & 13 Proposal (Link Tax, Copyright Law)
« Reply #9 on: Sep 13, 2018, 03:18:24 pm »
 

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Achtung! Little nation of shopkeepers! Come out and surrender!

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SOPA.au: Australia is the Testbed for the World’s Most Extreme Copyright Blocks






'It’s been three years since Australia adopted a national copyright blocking system, despite widespread public outcry over the abusive, far-reaching potential of the system, and the warnings that it would not achieve its stated goal of preventing copyright infringement.

Three years later, the experts who warned that censorship wouldn’t drive people to licensed services have been vindicated. According to the giant media companies who drove the copyright debate in 2015, the national censorship system has not convinced Australians to pay up.

But rather than rethink their approach — say, by bringing Australian media pricing in line with the prices paid elsewhere in the world, and by giving Australians access to the same movies, music and TV as their peers in the US and elsewhere — Australia’s Big Content execs have demanded even more censorship powers, with less oversight, and for more sites and services.

The current Australian censorship system allows rightsholders to secure court orders requiring the country’s ISPs to block sites whose “primary purpose” is to “is to infringe, or to facilitate the infringement of, copyright (whether or not in Australia).”

Under the new proposal, rightsholders will be able to demand blocks for sites whose “primary effect” is copyright infringement. What’s more, rightsholders will be able to secure injunctions against search engines, forcing them to delist search-results that refer to the banned site.

Finally rightsholders will be able to order blocks for sites, addresses and domains that provide access to blocked sites, without going back to court.

Taken together, these new measures, combined with the overbroad language from 2015, are a recipe for unbridled, unstoppable censorship — and it still won’t achieve the goals of copyright law.'


Read more: SOPA.au: Australia is the Testbed for the World’s Most Extreme Copyright Blocks



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I like this. Because I hate those High Ads density sites (which indicate perhaps that the big news sites are in financial straits) but which never complete loading or pop up videos playing in the corner or ..or ..

This site offered 'set your cookie preferences, or go to the plain-text site'.
I did and I like it. It reminds me of the days before the agony of visiting one page would tire me.

When the web battle-ground is emptied; the corpses carried off or buried, this is what I'd enjoy more of.




>>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<<

The internet, as it is, will go away. Probably becoming just the backbone of HDTV streaming. That's what Jones predicted ... years ago. JONES does it correctly, more or less.  He's doing what he set out to do. The rest: WashPost, NYTimes, HuffPost, ... Daily Mail ... and 399 MILLION others! Many of them are responding to that new arena. And they want the action but it's not rightly theirs' to take.
That's being a freeloader.
They're still Dinosaurs by definition.

The web/net, has become a battleground and that's not my idea of fun, when we have to sort through crap, misinfo, misdirection, distraction, plain propaganda and lies every fecking visit. And a single large commercial-type news page can be covered in all these elements at once.That's just stupid. Even layout and design is lost in the panic that obviously infects the web-authors minds.

So we have to come up with ideas ...







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Yes, I like it ... and I get it.
Here's my idea of a good plain-text with image page.





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I have my cookies setting set correctly. That is, they're all active, 3rd party and all ...


So I still get these nag 'Advertising settings' pop-ups every few days or weeks.


Which would infer that they are resetting 'server-side' the cookies ... to force advertising through.


And today I reset all my settings to OFF ... no personalised ads and then I log back in and they're active!


I am the one, who contacts the ICO this week, and I know the ICO are not a powerless offshore digital.
















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EU is about to destroy your Internet with Article 13 censorship insanity
« Reply #14 on: Dec 02, 2018, 06:47:34 am »
 

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http://www.digitaltveurope.com/



The EU is about to destroy your Internet with Article 13 censorship insanity - act now
http://www.digitaltveurope.com/2018/11/26/youtube-urges-content-creators-to-speak-out-against-article-13/





'YouTube is encouraging content creators to speak out against the European Parliament’s copyright reform initiative, claiming new legislation would force it to “block the vast majority of uploads from Europe”.

The video giant has launched a ‘Save Your Internet’ website and is using a corresponding hashtag to mobilise its userbase, urging content creators to make videos, tweet and “join the movement” against Article 13 of the EU’s proposed copyright legislation.

“Article 13 is part of European copyright legislation created with the intent to better protect creativity and find effective ways for copyright holders to protect their content online,” said YouTube.

“We support the goals of Article 13, but the version written by the European Parliament could have large unintended consequences that would change the web as we know it.” Spam_A Spam_B YouTube argues that the proposed version of Article 13 would eliminate existing notice-and-takedown systems, meaning services like YouTube, Facebook, Dailymotion and Soundcloud would be liable for any copyright infringement at the moment of upload.

“Platforms including YouTube would be forced to block the vast majority of uploads from Europe and views in Europe for content uploaded elsewhere given the uncertainty and complexity of copyright ownership,” it said in an FAQ page about Article 13.

YouTube claims that the risks associated with accepting content uploads with partial or disputed copyright information “would be far too large” and that content creators would bear the brunt of this – with music videos and covers, mashups and parody videos all at particular risk of being blocked.

“Article 13 threatens hundreds of thousands of jobs, European creators, businesses, artists and everyone they employ,” said YouTube. “We’re asking lawmakers to find a better balance we all need to protect against copyright violations and still enable European users, creators and artists to share their voices online.”'



Read More : The EU is about to destroy your Internet with Article 13 censorship insanity - act now



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Re: GDPR Article 11 & 13 Proposal (Link Tax, Copyright Law)
« Reply #15 on: Dec 02, 2018, 06:59:14 am »
 

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The Activist Post


Yes, the EU’s New #CopyrightDirective is All About Filters
http://www.activistpost.com/2018/11/yes-the-eus-new-copyrightdirective-is-all-about-filters.html





'When the EU started planning its new Copyright Directive (the “Copyright in the Digital Single Market Directive”), a group of powerful entertainment industry lobbyists pushed a terrible idea: a mandate that all online platforms would have to create crowdsourced databases of “copyrighted materials” and then block users from posting anything that matched the contents of those databases.

At the time, we, along with academics and technologists explained why this would undermine the Internet, even as it would prove unworkable. The filters would be incredibly expensive to create, would erroneously block whole libraries worth of legitimate materials, allow libraries more worth of infringing materials to slip through, and would not be capable of sorting out “fair dealing” uses of copyrighted works from infringing ones. Spam_A Spam_B The Commission nonetheless included it in their original draft. Two years later, after the European Parliament went back and forth on whether to keep the loosely described filters, with German MEP Axel Voss finally squeezing a narrow victory in his own committee, and an emergency vote of the whole Parliament. Now, after a lot of politicking and lobbying, Article 13 is potentially only a few weeks away from becoming officially an EU directive, controlling the internet access of more than 500,000,000 Europeans.

The proponents of Article 13 have a problem, though: filters don’t work, they cost a lot, they underblock, they overblock, they are ripe for abuse (basically, all the objections the Commission’s experts raised the first time around). So to keep Article 13 alive, they’ve spun, distorted and obfuscated its intention, and now they can be found in the halls of power, proclaiming to the politicians who’ll get the final vote that “Article 13 does not mean copyright filters.”

But it does.

Here’s a list of Frequently Obfuscated Questions and our answers. We think that after you’ve read them, you’ll agree: Article 13 is about filters, can only be about filters, and will result in filters.'



Read More : Yes, the EU’s New #CopyrightDirective is All About Filters



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The End of the Internet… Death by Article 13 Law
« Reply #16 on: Dec 11, 2018, 07:38:44 am »
 

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The End of the Internet… Death by Article 13 Law

















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Re: GDPR Article 11 & 13 Proposal (Link Tax, Copyright Law)
« Reply #17 on: Dec 12, 2018, 07:03:21 am »
 

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Four million Europeans’ Signatures Opposing Article 13 Have Been Delivered to the European Parliament
http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/12/four-million-europeans-signatures-opposing-article-13-have-been-delivered-european





'Lawmakers in the European Union (EU) often lament the lack of citizen engagement with the complex policy questions that they wrestle with in Strasbourg and Brussels, so we assume that they will be delighted to learn that more than 4,000,000 of their constituents have signed a petition opposing Article 13 of the new Copyright in the Single Market Directive. They oppose it for two main reasons: because it will inevitably lead to the creation of algorithmic copyright filters that only US Big Tech companies can afford (making the field less competitive and thus harder for working artists to negotiate better deals in) and because these filters will censor enormous quantities of legitimate material, thanks to inevitable algorithmic errors and abuse. Spam_A Spam_B Currently, the Directive is in the "trilogue" phase, where European national governments and the EU negotiate its final form behind closed doors. We're told that the final language may emerge as soon as this week, with the intention of rushing a vote before Christmas, despite the absolute shambles that the negotiations have made of the text.

On Monday, a delegation from the signatories officially presented the Trilogue negotiators with the names of 4,000,000+ Europeans who oppose Article 13. These 4,000,000 are in esteemed company: Article 13 is also opposed by the “father of the Internet”, Vint Cerf, and the creator of the Web, Tim Berners-Lee and more than 70 of the Internet's top technical experts, not to mention Europe's largest sports leagues and film studios. Burgeoning movements opposing the measure have sprung up in Italy and Poland.'



Read More : Four million Europeans’ Signatures Opposing Article 13 Have Been Delivered to the European Parliament



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Re: GDPR - Final Version (even worse?)
« Reply #18 on: Feb 20, 2019, 12:30:10 pm »
 

poseidonlost

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Hm. This article's been out for a week now.

https://eff.org/deeplinks/2019/02/final-version-eus-copyright-directive-worst-one-yet

The Final Version of the EU's Copyright Directive Is the Worst One Yet

By Cory Doctorow
February 13, 2019

Quote
Despite ringing denunciations from small EU tech businesses, giant EU entertainment companies, artists' groups, technical experts, and human rights experts, and the largest body of concerned citizens in EU history, the EU has concluded its "trilogues" on the new Copyright Directive, striking a deal that—amazingly—is worse than any in the Directive's sordid history. [continues...]



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Re: GDPR? Oh Horror! GOOGLE & FæcesBOOK to the rescue. Hazah!
« Reply #19 on: Feb 21, 2019, 05:40:14 am »
 

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The Daily Mail


EU backs copyright law that could force Google and Facebook to block huge amounts of posts - sparking protests at 'censorship of the web'
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6725413/EU-countries-copyright-reforms-aimed-Google-Facebook.html





'EU countries have backed an overhaul of the bloc's copyright rules which would force Google and Facebook to filter out copyright-protected content on their platforms - including YouTube and Instagram - and pay publishers for news snippets.

The proposal, endorsed by EU members states on Wednesday, is unpopular with many Europeans who view it as an attempt to censor the web.

Thousands gathered in Cologne at the weekend to protest against the move, which they say will be a de facto 'meme ban' - as the internet jokes are often based on copyrighted images and video. Outrage worsened this week after the EU Commission was forced to take down an online post in which it called opponents of the controversial proposal a 'mob' and implied they had been hoodwinked by powerful tech companies.

The piece - titled 'How the mob was told to save the dragon and slay the knight' - was deleted and replaced with a message saying it had been taken down because people had not correctly understood it.

This only fueled the anger of its opponents, who felt they were owed an an apology.

The lobbying battle has raged since September 2016 when the European Commission proposed to modernise copyright for the digital age, sparking a major debate between tech giants, artistic creators and member states.'



Read More : EU backs copyright law that could force Google and Facebook to block huge amounts of posts - sparking protests at 'censorship of the web'



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Re: GDPR? Oh Horror! GOOGLE & FæcesBOOK to the rescue. Hazah!
« Reply #20 on: Mar 06, 2019, 03:46:31 am »
 

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German Data Privacy Commissioner Says Article 13 Inevitably Leads to Filters, Which Inevitably Lead to Internet “Oligopoly”




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Re: GDPR? Oh Horror! GOOGLE & FæcesBOOK to the rescue. Hazah!
« Reply #21 on: Mar 23, 2019, 04:07:45 am »
 

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More Than 130 European Businesses Tell the European Parliament: Reject the #CopyrightDirective
http://www.activistpost.com/2019/03/more-than-130-european-businesses-tell-the-european-parliament-reject-the-copyrightdirective.html





'The EU’s Copyright Directive will be voted on in the week of March 25 (our sources suggest the vote will take place on March 27th, but that could change); the Directive has been controversial all along, but it took a turn for the catastrophic during the late stages of the negotiation, which yielded a final text that is alarming in its potential consequences for all internet activity in Europe and around the world.

More than 5,000,000 Europeans have signed a petition against Article 13 of the Directive, and there has been outcry from eminent technical experts, the United Nations’ special rapporteur on free expression, and many other quarters. Now, a coalition of more than 130 EU businesses have entered the fray, led by file storage service NextCloud. Their letter to the European Parliament calls Article 13—which will lead to mass adoption of copyright filters for online services that will monitor and block user-submitted text, audio, video and images—a “dangerous experiment with the core foundation of the Internet’s ecosystem.” They also condemn Article 11, which will allow news publishers to decide who can quote and link to news stories and charge for the right to do so.

Importantly, they identify a key risk of the Directive, which is that it will end up advantaging US Big Tech firms that can afford monitoring duties, and that will collect “massive amounts of data” sent by Europeans.

March 21st is an EU-wide day of action on the Copyright Directive, with large site blackouts planned (including German Wikipedia), and on March 23, there will be mass demonstrations across the EU. Things are getting down to the wire here, folks.'



Read More : More Than 130 European Businesses Tell the European Parliament: Reject the #CopyrightDirective



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Re: GDPR? Oh Horror! GOOGLE & FæcesBOOK to the rescue. Hazah!
« Reply #22 on: Mar 26, 2019, 04:45:08 am »
 

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Tens of Thousands of Germans Take to Streets to Protest EU Copyright Reform
http://sputniknews.com/europe/201903231073489568-germany-european-union-copyright-reform-protests/





The planned changes would require, in part, that tech giants such as Facebook and YouTube take responsibility for copyright materials users upload to their platforms. Though the measure is claimed to be aimed at protecting copyright holders, many note that it can easily be used to restrict freedom of speech.

Tens of thousands of people in different German cities have gathered for a massive protest against the copyright reforms planned by the European Union, DPA reported. The outrage is connected with some parts of the legislation: in particular, Article 11, which allows publishers to charge platforms if they link to their stories (the "link tax"), and Article 13, putting legal responsibility on platforms for users uploading copyrighted material (the so-called ‘upload filter').
<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en">
<p dir="ltr" lang="und">#Münster #uploadfillter #Artikel13 #europademo pic.twitter.com/3qrfwSeIQR</p>
— Dieser Name ist Urheberrechtlich geschützt (@xodomsexo) March 23, 2019[/size][/quote]



Read More : Tens of Thousands of Germans Take to Streets to Protest EU Copyright Reform



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The EU Just Destroyed The Internet #Article11 #Article13
« Reply #23 on: Mar 29, 2019, 05:23:31 am »
 

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The EU Just Destroyed The Internet #Article11 #Article13

















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Re: GDPR? Oh Horror! GOOGLE & FæcesBOOK to the rescue. Hazah!
« Reply #24 on: Apr 04, 2019, 05:48:29 am »
 

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After Insisting That EU Copyright Directive Didn't Require Filters, France Immediately Starts Promoting Filters
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20190327/17141241885/after-insisting-that-eu-copyright-directive-didnt-require-filters-france-immediately-starts-promoting-filters.shtml





'For months now we've all heard the refrain: Article 13 (now Article 17) of the EU Copyright Directive would not require filters. We all knew it was untrue. We pointed out many times that it was untrue, and that there was literally no way to comply unless you implemented filters (filters that wouldn't work and would ban legitimate speech), and were yelled at for pointing this out. Here's the MEP in charge of the Directive flat out insisting that it won't require filters last year:




In other words, now that the law is passed, it's time for everyone to install filters.

Riester also suggests that France may be the first to transpose the Directive into French law, meaning that it may be implemented long before required under the Directive. As he said: "there is no time to lose on this subject." If you're a site that has any user-generated content in France, good luck. Your government just sold you out. Of course, if you're a company selling filters, I guess send your lobbyists over to Paris quick and cash in.'



Source   - TechDirt



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