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History / Re: Philippines - July 2 1902
« Last post by Al Bundy on Today at 03:41:48 pm »
https://kahimyang.com/kauswagan/articles/800/today-in-philippine-history-december-8-1941-japan-launched-a-surprise-attack-on-the-philippines
Today in Philippine History, December 8, 1941, Japan launched a surprise attack on the Philippines

On December 8, 1941, Japan launched a surprise attack on the Philippines, just ten hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Initial aerial bombardment was followed by landings of ground troops both north and south of Manila.

 The defending Philippine and United States troops were under the command of General Douglas MacArthur, who had been recalled to active duty in the United States Army earlier in the year and was designated commander of the United States Armed Forces in the Asia-Pacific region. The aircraft of his command were destroyed; the naval forces were ordered to leave; and because of the circumstances in the Pacific region, reinforcement and resupply of his ground forces were impossible.

Under the pressure of superior numbers, the defending forces withdrew to the Bataan Peninsula and to the island of Corregidor at the entrance to Manila Bay. Manila, declared an open city to prevent its destruction, was occupied by the Japanese on January 2, 1942.

The Philippine defense continued until the final surrender of United States-Philippine forces on the Bataan Peninsula in April 1942 and on Corregidor in May. Most of the 80,000 prisoners of war captured by the Japanese at Bataan were forced to undertake the infamous "Death March" to a prison camp 105 kilometers to the north. It is estimated that as many as 10,000 men, weakened by disease and malnutrition and treated harshly by their captors, died before reaching their destination. Quezon and Osmeña had accompanied the troops to Corregidor and later left for the United States, where they set up a government in exile. MacArthur was ordered to Australia, where he started to plan for a return to the Philippines.


...

| - - - -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippines_campaign_(1941%E2%80%931942)

...

The Japanese launched the invasion by sea from Formosa over 200 miles (320 km) to the north of the Philippines. The defending forces outnumbered the Japanese by 3 to 2, however they were a mixed force of non-combat experienced regular, national guard, constabulary and newly created Commonwealth units. The Japanese used first-line troops at the outset of the campaign, and concentrating their forces enabled a swift overrun of most of Luzon during the first month.

...
The USAFFE's aviation arm was the Far East Air Force (FEAF) of the U.S. Army Air Forces, commanded by Maj. Gen. Lewis H. Brereton. Previously the Philippine Department Air Force and Air Force USAFFE, the air force was activated on 16 November 1941 and was the largest USAAF combat air organization outside the United States. Its primary combat power in December 1941 consisted of 91 serviceable P-40 Warhawk fighters and 34 B-17 Flying Fortress bombers, with further modern aircraft en route. Tactically the FEAF was part of the Reserve Force, so that it fell under MacArthur's direct command.

...

News reached the Philippines that an attack on Pearl Harbor was in progress at 2:20 am local time on 8 December 1941.[32][33] FEAF interceptors had already conducted an air search for incoming aircraft reported shortly after midnight, but these had been Japanese scout planes reporting weather conditions.[34][35] At 3:30 am, Brigadier General Richard Sutherland, chief of staff to General Douglas MacArthur heard about the attack from a commercial radio broadcast.[32]At 5:00 am FEAF commander Gen. Brereton reported to USAFFE headquarters where he attempted to see MacArthur without success. He recommended to MacArthur's chief of staff, Brig. Gen. Richard Sutherland, that FEAF launch bombing missions against Formosa in accordance with Rainbow 5 war plan directives from which an attack was likely to come. Gen. Breteron was further made aware of an attack against the USS William B. Preston at Davao Bay.[36] Authorization was withheld, but shortly afterward, in response to a telegram from General George C. Marshall instructing MacArthur to implement Rainbow 5, Brereton was ordered to have a strike in readiness for later approval.[35][37]
...

At 08:00 am, Brereton received a telephone call from Gen. Henry H. Arnold warning him not to allow his aircraft to be attacked while still on the ground. FEAF launched three squadron-sized fighter patrols and all of its serviceable bombers on Luzon between 08:00 and 08:30 am as a precautionary move.[38] After MacArthur gave Brereton the authorization he sought at 10:15 am, the bombers were ordered to land and prepare for the afternoon raid on Formosa. All three pursuit squadrons began to run short on fuel and broke off their patrols at the same time.

...

Even though tracked by radar and with three U.S. pursuit squadrons in the air, when Japanese bombers of the 11th Kōkūkantai attacked Clark Field at 12:40 pm,[43] they achieved tactical surprise.

Two squadrons of B-17s were dispersed on the ground.

Most of the P-40s of the 20th PS were preparing to taxi and were struck by the first wave of 27 Japanese twin-engine Mitsubishi G3M "Nell" bombers; only four of the 20th PS P-40Bs managed to take off as the bombs were falling.
...
A near-simultaneous attack on the auxiliary field at Iba to the northwest by 54 "Betty" bombers was also successful: all but four of the 3rd Pursuit Squadron's P-40s, short on fuel and caught in their landing pattern, were destroyed in combat or from lack of fuel.[45] Twelve P-40s from the 20th (four), 21st (two), and 3rd (six) Squadrons attacked the strafers but with little success, losing at least four of their own.

The Far East Air Force lost fully half its planes in the 45-minute attack, and was all but destroyed over the next few days, including a number of the surviving B-17s lost to takeoff crashes of other planes
...
That night FEAF combat strength had been reduced to 12 operable B-17s, 22 P-40s, and 8 P-35s.
...
Clark Field was abandoned as a bomber field on 11 December after being used as a staging base for a handful of B-17 missions.[48] Between 17 and 20 December, the 14 surviving B-17s were withdrawn to Australia.

Every other aircraft of the FEAF was destroyed or captured.
...

No formal investigation took place regarding this failure as occurred in the aftermath of Pearl Harbor. After the war, Brereton and Sutherland in effect blamed each other for FEAF being surprised on the ground, and MacArthur released a statement claiming that he had no knowledge of any recommendation to attack Formosa with B-17

The Philippine-American War 1899-1902

The victory of the US empire and the First Philippine Republic is abolished.
The Philippines has become another US colony.
Over 200,000 Filipinos were killed.
2
History / Re: Philippines - Dec 8 1941
« Last post by tahoeblue on Today at 03:15:09 pm »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyvtabQjRrc
Carole Landis Lloyd Nolan Bombed ~ Manila Calling Scene

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOl5YpFVGYU
How To Start The B-17 Engine

https://www.defensemedianetwork.com/stories/activating-rainbow-5-and-indigo-3/
...
Despite their tense and awkward relationship, throughout the war Marshall was scrupulous in providing MacArthur with all the support he could. In memoranda to the president and to Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Harold Stark, Marshall itemized a shopping list of men and matériel being shipped to the Philippines from August through December 1941. It included everything from tanks, troops, artillery, and anti-aircraft artillery to about 130 fighters, most of them P-40s, and more than 70 modern B-17 Flying Fortresses.

https://www.pacificwar.org.au/Philippines/USpreps.html
...

Even though the Philippines was regarded as a likely primary target in the event of war with Japan, MacArthur took no significant steps to place his command on war alert. As he was preparing to depart on another frivolous overseas liaison mission for MacArthur, General Brereton warned his commander that the B-17 bombers at Clark Field near Manila were within range of Japanese bombers from Formosa (now Taiwan). Brereton proposed that the B-17s be moved to an airbase on the southern Philippine island of Mindaneo. [10] MacArthur agreed, but seventeen of his total force of thirty-five B-17s were still sitting on the airstrip at Clark Field when the Japanese attacked that airbase on 8 December 1941.

The failure of MacArthur and Brereton to pay proper heed to General Marshall's war warning of 27 November is demonstrated by the fact that neither man saw any need to cancel a lavish party held in the ballroom of MacArthur's hotel on the night of 7 December 1941 (Manila Time). Crewmen of the B-17s still sitting on the ground at Clark Field attended the party which lasted until 2.00 am on the morning of 8 December 1941.The revelling pilots were carrying orders to fly these vital aircraft to Mindaneo on the very day that the Japanese attacked. [11]

| - - - -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Rainsford_Stark

...

Stark's most controversial service involved the growing menace of Japanese forces in the period before America was bombed into the war by the attack on Pearl Harbor. The controversy centers on whether he and his Director of War Plans, Admiral Richmond K. Turner, provided sufficient information to Admiral Husband E. Kimmel, Commander of the Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor, about Japanese moves in the fall of 1941 to enable Kimmel to anticipate an attack and to take steps to counter it. Captain (later Rear Admiral) Edwin T. Layton was Kimmel's chief intelligence officer (later also Admiral Chester W. Nimitz's intelligence officer) at the time of the attack.

In his book, And I Was There: Pearl Harbor and Midway—Breaking the Secrets (1985), Layton maintained that Stark offered meaningless advice throughout the period, withheld vital information at the insistence of his Director of War Plans, Admiral Turner, showed timidity in dealing with the Japanese, and utterly failed to provide anything of use to Kimmel.[6]

John Costello (Layton's co-author), in Days of Infamy (Pocket, 1994), points out that Douglas MacArthur had complete access to both PURPLE and JN-25, with over eight hours warning, and was still caught by surprise.

Moreover, as Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers official historian Gordon Prange and his colleagues note in December 7, 1941 (McGraw-Hill, 1988), the defense of the fleet was General Walter C. Short's responsibility, not Kimmel's. Turner's insistence on having intelligence go through War Plans led Office of Naval Intelligence to a wrong belief that it was only to collect intelligence; Turner did not correct his view or aid Stark in understanding the problem.[7] Among others,[8] Morison and Layton agree that Turner was most responsible for the debacle, as does Ned Beach in Scapegoats (Annapolis, 1995).

In addition, there was considerable confusion over where Japan might strike, whether against the US, the Soviet Union, or British colonies in Asia and the Far East.[9]

https://www.nytimes.com/1972/08/21/archives/adm-harold-stark-dies-operations-chief-in-1941.html

...
When Adm. Harold Raynsford Stark became Chief of Naval Operations in August, 1939, his main task was the creation of a “two‐ocean navy” to meet the threat of Germany and Japan.
...
Three months after the attack he was superseded in the Navy's top command by the more aggressive Adm. Ernest J. King. There was little criticism of Admiral Stark at the time, however. He was decorated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and’ given command of United States naval forces in European waters, a post he held until the defeat of Germany in 1945. ...  the assignment was ambiguous, since the British exercised over‐all naval command in the area. Admiral Stark's tasks were primarily administrative. He was liaison between Washington and Whitehall.
3
History / Re: Philippines 1521
« Last post by Al Bundy on Today at 02:26:19 pm »
1521

The Philippines were claimed in the name of Spain in 1521 by Ferdinand Magellan, a Portuguese explorer sailing for Spain, who named the islands after King Philip II of Spain. They were then called Las Felipinas.

P.S. Spain. From Empire to the brink of state breakup because the Catalans want their own state.

Who gave the idea to the Catalans? US Empire and UN that created and recognized the self-proclaimed "Republic of Kosovo".
Well, the Catalans say "When Albanians in Kosovo can secede from Serbia, we can make the Republic of Catalonia too."
4
General Discussion / Re: All Your Base Are Belong To Us
« Last post by tahoeblue on Today at 12:24:47 pm »
https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/divide+and+conquer
The exact term is a translation of a Roman maxim, divide et impera (divide and rule).

divide and conquer
1. To gain or maintain power by generating tension among others, epecially those less powerful, so that they cannot unite in opposition. Rachel is so popular because she divides and conquers all of her minions and makes sure they all dislike each other.


Diversity is our Strength

https://www.jihadwatch.org/2019/12/london-mayor-sadiq-khan-one-of-our-strengths-is-our-diversity
London Mayor Sadiq Khan: “One of Our Strengths Is Our Diversity”
Dec 8, 2019 10:00 am By Hugh Fitzgerald

Sadiq Khan, the Muslim mayor of London, and a tireless apologist for Islam, had his usual reaction to the latest murders by Muslim terrorists in “the greatest city in the world.” For Sadiq Khan, the defense and promotion of “diversity” has become an obsession. Last summer Sadiq Khan earned the outrage of many Londoners for his expensive focus on this “diversity”; they discovered he now spends annually close to $2 million on”diversity” bosses for London Transport, far more than he does on employees devoted to keeping fares down, or on improving safety in the system.
...
Khan’s latest praise of “diversity”:

    London mayor Sadiq Khan told reporters that diversity is one of the British capital’s strengths in the wake of the London Bridge attack, and that all great cities are targets for terrorists.

    “Look, I’m mayor of the greatest city in the world, and one of our strengths is our diversity,” he told reporters shortly the attack by Usman Khan, a convicted radical Islamic terrorist who had been freed from prison on a tag after serving less than half of a 16-year term, which left two dead and three injured.
...
This insistence that “diversity is our strength” is the byword not just of Sadiq Khan, but of many European politicians, and above all, of Chancellor Merkel. It is stated as a given; no evidence need be offered. But why should we accept this assertion? Is all “diversity” a “source of strength”? What kind of “strength”? Start asking these questions, and you will not get a coherent answer, but merely self-satisfied repetition of the mantra that brooks of no disagreement.
...
So according to Mayor Khan, terrorism is something you’ve just got to accept, it’s the price we all pay for the privilege of living in a great city, we just have to prepare ourselves, there’s nothing much else to be done.

| - - - -

https://www.thediplomad.com/2018/01/perversity-is-our-strength.html
Perversity is Our Strength!

 a new slogan for the Hollywood crowd and the legions of progressive bien pensants who besiege us daily.


This slogan fits you like a glove.

I am talking about you, Woody Allen, Meryl Streep, Harvey Weinstein, James Franco, Jane Fonda, Madonna, Kevin Spacey, and on and on.

"Perversity is our Strength!"

Shout it loud!


Shout it proud!

You earned it!

Shout it from your walled-in mansions! Shout it from your limos! Have your agents put it out in press releases!

Wear it like a Pussy Hat!
5
Taxation / Re: Trump impose sanctions on China
« Last post by tahoeblue on Today at 11:52:15 am »
https://www.zerohedge.com/political/hong-kong-protests-attract-massive-crowds-estimated-800k-march-financial-district
Hong Kong Protests Attract Massive Crowds, Estimated 800k March In Financial District
Sun, 12/08/2019 - 10:15

With zero signs of abating, hundreds of thousands of pro-democracy protestors lined the streets around Hong Kong's financial and shopping districts on Sunday, demanding the Beijing-backed Hong Kong government fulfill their demands, reported Reuters.

The semi-peaceful protest, a drastic change from violent ones in the last several weeks that have been raging for at least six months, plunged the city into a dangerous recession in Nov., attracted at least 800,000 participants on Sunday, according to protest organizer Civil Human Rights Front. Though Hong Kong police said, approximately 200,000 showed up.


...

China has become more vocal about Western powers interfering in the Hong Kong protests since the US signed the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act HKHRDA) into law last month. This allows Washington to impose sanctions against Chinese and Hong Kong leaders responsible for human rights violations during the protests.

Beijing was furious when the US lawmakers passed HKHRDA, which they have vowed to retaliate with a no-entry list for US lawmakers behind drafting the bill, along with other government officials, though the true extent of the retaliation remains a mystery.

On Saturday, we noted that the president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong was detained and then denied access to the neighboring Chinese city of Macau.


https://twitter.com/rachelblundy/status/1203616051071602688?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1203616051071602688&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.zerohedge.com%2Fpolitical%2Fhong-kong-protests-attract-massive-crowds-estimated-800k-march-financial-district


Rachel Blundy
‏Verified account @rachelblundy

If you made a bet on Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement still bringing out huge crowds after six consecutive months of demonstrations, well done, please collect your winnings
6
History / Philippines - Dec 8 1941
« Last post by tahoeblue on Today at 10:57:37 am »
https://kahimyang.com/kauswagan/articles/800/today-in-philippine-history-december-8-1941-japan-launched-a-surprise-attack-on-the-philippines
Today in Philippine History, December 8, 1941, Japan launched a surprise attack on the Philippines

On December 8, 1941, Japan launched a surprise attack on the Philippines, just ten hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Initial aerial bombardment was followed by landings of ground troops both north and south of Manila.

 The defending Philippine and United States troops were under the command of General Douglas MacArthur, who had been recalled to active duty in the United States Army earlier in the year and was designated commander of the United States Armed Forces in the Asia-Pacific region. The aircraft of his command were destroyed; the naval forces were ordered to leave; and because of the circumstances in the Pacific region, reinforcement and resupply of his ground forces were impossible.

Under the pressure of superior numbers, the defending forces withdrew to the Bataan Peninsula and to the island of Corregidor at the entrance to Manila Bay. Manila, declared an open city to prevent its destruction, was occupied by the Japanese on January 2, 1942.

The Philippine defense continued until the final surrender of United States-Philippine forces on the Bataan Peninsula in April 1942 and on Corregidor in May. Most of the 80,000 prisoners of war captured by the Japanese at Bataan were forced to undertake the infamous "Death March" to a prison camp 105 kilometers to the north. It is estimated that as many as 10,000 men, weakened by disease and malnutrition and treated harshly by their captors, died before reaching their destination. Quezon and Osmeña had accompanied the troops to Corregidor and later left for the United States, where they set up a government in exile. MacArthur was ordered to Australia, where he started to plan for a return to the Philippines.


...

| - - - -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippines_campaign_(1941%E2%80%931942)

...

The Japanese launched the invasion by sea from Formosa over 200 miles (320 km) to the north of the Philippines. The defending forces outnumbered the Japanese by 3 to 2, however they were a mixed force of non-combat experienced regular, national guard, constabulary and newly created Commonwealth units. The Japanese used first-line troops at the outset of the campaign, and concentrating their forces enabled a swift overrun of most of Luzon during the first month.

...
The USAFFE's aviation arm was the Far East Air Force (FEAF) of the U.S. Army Air Forces, commanded by Maj. Gen. Lewis H. Brereton. Previously the Philippine Department Air Force and Air Force USAFFE, the air force was activated on 16 November 1941 and was the largest USAAF combat air organization outside the United States. Its primary combat power in December 1941 consisted of 91 serviceable P-40 Warhawk fighters and 34 B-17 Flying Fortress bombers, with further modern aircraft en route. Tactically the FEAF was part of the Reserve Force, so that it fell under MacArthur's direct command.

...

News reached the Philippines that an attack on Pearl Harbor was in progress at 2:20 am local time on 8 December 1941.[32][33] FEAF interceptors had already conducted an air search for incoming aircraft reported shortly after midnight, but these had been Japanese scout planes reporting weather conditions.[34][35] At 3:30 am, Brigadier General Richard Sutherland, chief of staff to General Douglas MacArthur heard about the attack from a commercial radio broadcast.[32]At 5:00 am FEAF commander Gen. Brereton reported to USAFFE headquarters where he attempted to see MacArthur without success. He recommended to MacArthur's chief of staff, Brig. Gen. Richard Sutherland, that FEAF launch bombing missions against Formosa in accordance with Rainbow 5 war plan directives from which an attack was likely to come. Gen. Breteron was further made aware of an attack against the USS William B. Preston at Davao Bay.[36] Authorization was withheld, but shortly afterward, in response to a telegram from General George C. Marshall instructing MacArthur to implement Rainbow 5, Brereton was ordered to have a strike in readiness for later approval.[35][37]
...

At 08:00 am, Brereton received a telephone call from Gen. Henry H. Arnold warning him not to allow his aircraft to be attacked while still on the ground. FEAF launched three squadron-sized fighter patrols and all of its serviceable bombers on Luzon between 08:00 and 08:30 am as a precautionary move.[38] After MacArthur gave Brereton the authorization he sought at 10:15 am, the bombers were ordered to land and prepare for the afternoon raid on Formosa. All three pursuit squadrons began to run short on fuel and broke off their patrols at the same time.

...

Even though tracked by radar and with three U.S. pursuit squadrons in the air, when Japanese bombers of the 11th Kōkūkantai attacked Clark Field at 12:40 pm,[43] they achieved tactical surprise.

Two squadrons of B-17s were dispersed on the ground.

Most of the P-40s of the 20th PS were preparing to taxi and were struck by the first wave of 27 Japanese twin-engine Mitsubishi G3M "Nell" bombers; only four of the 20th PS P-40Bs managed to take off as the bombs were falling.
...
A near-simultaneous attack on the auxiliary field at Iba to the northwest by 54 "Betty" bombers was also successful: all but four of the 3rd Pursuit Squadron's P-40s, short on fuel and caught in their landing pattern, were destroyed in combat or from lack of fuel.[45] Twelve P-40s from the 20th (four), 21st (two), and 3rd (six) Squadrons attacked the strafers but with little success, losing at least four of their own.

The Far East Air Force lost fully half its planes in the 45-minute attack, and was all but destroyed over the next few days, including a number of the surviving B-17s lost to takeoff crashes of other planes
...
That night FEAF combat strength had been reduced to 12 operable B-17s, 22 P-40s, and 8 P-35s.
...
Clark Field was abandoned as a bomber field on 11 December after being used as a staging base for a handful of B-17 missions.[48] Between 17 and 20 December, the 14 surviving B-17s were withdrawn to Australia.

Every other aircraft of the FEAF was destroyed or captured.
...

No formal investigation took place regarding this failure as occurred in the aftermath of Pearl Harbor. After the war, Brereton and Sutherland in effect blamed each other for FEAF being surprised on the ground, and MacArthur released a statement claiming that he had no knowledge of any recommendation to attack Formosa with B-17
7
One SnailStream Daily noticed:

CHEAP SHOT
Donald Trump mocked by Donald Tusk in bizarre picture that
shows EU leader holding two fingers up in ‘gun’ gesture.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/worldnews/10492830/donald-trump-mocked-by-donald-tusk-gun-gesture/
5 Dec 2019, 21:44


Former EU Council chief Tusk posted the snap which shows him holding two fingers to Trump’s back.


Justin Trudeau speaks to a near empty room at the end of the Nato meeting.


The rest are off buying special presents for their special friends;
and just another case of 'whatever' won't suffice.



Justin Trudeau appears to get the cold shoulder on stage.
POTUS Trump looks tired because he knows what we have to put up with from sharp youthful parasitics.


Who'd vote for people like this? This business is not a good plan for their future and it's not good name building.
And you people don't understand? Sure, live a life on the dole but these people will not fix it for you.
These people want you living like that, destroyed on Social-Security, limping around like Scotsmen.
You have to have much more vision & a drive, that includes far more than the possible need to use
Bio-weapons on your own peoples. I will be glad, you will, when Americans come to liberate us again.
8
Yeah, this Donald Tusk is a comedian, a real f*****g comedienne.
I think he's so funny he should be a clown, see; and go join the circus.
And, I tell you what we will all gonna do, I'm a-putta him in with the Lions.

9
So what we need this Winter, on The European Steppe, is some finely honed Rasta Sniper.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest_recorded_sniper_kills
Collect some Tusks and other souvenirs.
10
History / Re: Balkans in WW1
« Last post by Al Bundy on Dec 06, 2019, 02:10:45 pm »
On December 5, 1918, exactly one hundred and one years ago, the Serbian Army entered Zagreb because the city authorities of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which had been in disintegration, left the city.



The citizens of Zagreb ( today capital of Republic of Croatia ) welcomed the Serbs with banners and professions:
Live freedom!
Long live Yugoslavia!
Long live King Aleksandar!


Just two weeks before that, on November 20, welcoming the liberation Serbian army at a port in the Croatian city of Split, the most respected Croatian politician,  Josip Smodlaka said to the assembled enthusiastic people:

"Brethren to our beloved heart, the dead Serbian knights! Welcome our invincible hawks! Welcome our liberators, proud of our flowers, most beautiful, dearest!
Blessed was the hour we saw you! Bless you every rate!
Blessed mothers who give birth to you! Blessed cradle that has blown you away! Blessed are your desolate homes, which in the black depend on us to be able to shed this golden sun of freedom, which now shines on us.
How long we have been after this time…! Together with you, we call on the one who prepared you for the victories, your supreme leader, grandson of the Grand Leader of Karadjordje, your Кing and ours.

Long live King Peter!

Long live the Serbian army! "
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